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20121204
20121204
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a deadly nerve gas. so the direct warnings president obama and secretary of state hillary clinton delivered to syria come as that country's ally, russia, signals that the use of chemical weapons is a red line for their own support for syria. joining me now is nbc's chief pentagon correspondent jim jim miklaszewski. a speech that really didn't have anything having to do with what syria, clearly there's intelligence on the ground that has u.s. officials concerned. >> reporter: that's right, chuck. all the latest intelligence indicates that the u.s., nato, and particularly the syrian people are really staring the worst case scenario directly in the face. just about the time rebel forces started to make significant advances in the capital da m damascus, u.s. officials tell nbc news that the assad regime informed its chemical weapons corps to get prepared. and just about that time, u.s. intelligence noticed a flurry of activity around several of the chemical weapons sites, an indication, perhaps, that the chemical corps is moving two precan cursor chemicals to the same locations to weaponize art
clinton and state counselors have been engaging for some time, and that is can we get a better answer than we have had in the past two how a new rise in power comes to the international system. and can we do so without running significant risks or indeed fall into conflict. >> thanks. please. >> i agree with everything the undersecretary has said your, and, in fact, admiral sam locklear underscore those pushes a couple days ago in australia. talking about engagement and that strategic trust. but it's interesting that the chinese tend to look at the american, ma asia pacific give it a sort of a continuing strategy. which speaks to the inability to really communicate with strategic effect. and i think you touched, steve, on a very important piece which was a seniority complex and if i can put it that way. china has felt that they were abused by major powers to the 19th century and well into the 20 century, and that has an interesting counterbalance, which is a seemed a bit of a superiority complex about the solutions that they are building on how china images as a global power. the disconten
representative cole if we restore the clinton tax rates today than in ten years, 2022, we have the deficit where it should be. >> guest: he is certainly correct to generate a great deal more revenue. if we did that let's say they made for under $50,000 that is a 2,000-dollar tax increase and again i don't think the president wants to do that. he said he doesn't want to do that our side doesn't want to do that. you know, going back to the clinton tax rate, and remember the average american family has taken a terrific hit. the median household income for years ago when the president became the president was around $54,000 a year and is about 50 now. so this portion of the population which is gotten squeezed tremendously i don't think adding an extra tax at the 98 percent is going to, number one, be very helpful to the more helpful to the economic growth. number two it's how much you want the folks to pay? so again, freezing those tax rates with an overwhelming majority of americans is a smart thing to do, we ought to do it and both sides say they want to. >> host: and you said earlier on -- >> gue
president clinton was in office, he left this country in the black. the people have weighed in. they've indicated that we want to move forward, we want to put people to work but we want to do it in a fair method of doing it. and that is not cutting programs that impacts the working poor in this country. mr. garamendi: well, you're absolutely correct about that. the proposal to cut medicare benefits is a nonstarter. there are things that can be done in medicare to reduce the costs and much has already been done. i'd like to ask my colleague from the great state of michigan to join us, mr. curson is a new member, came in during a special election. welcome. delighted to have you join us. mr. curson: thank you. i agree wholeheartedly with what's been said so far and the testimony, what i really want to say -- into the mic. what i really want to say is medicare is run more efficiently than nearly any insurance company in the world. they devote less than 2% of its funding to administrative expenses, and you compare that to a private insurance company that costs up to 40% of premiums for in
hillary clinton as she prepares to step down. michael bloomberg called clinton to encourage her to enter the 2013 race for new york mayor when his term end. "the new york times" made it clear that she had no interest in the job. if she, however, decides to change her mind, she has one hurdle she has to overcome. she has to be a resident of the city. she bought a home when sheep deep sided to run for senate. >> exactly. >> new york senate years ago. >> you would imagine hillary clinton is one of the superstars in politics, and she has certain star power. you would think if she comes back into politics at this point -- they say she is not -- she would want a national office compared to a big, big job like mayor of new york city. if she gets in the game, she's going for the top again. the white house, not here in new york. >> what is mayor bloomberg going to do, steps down december 31st of 2013. >> count his money, i guess. >>> speaking of money, mitt romney is making a career move of sorts. he's rejoining the board of directors for marriott hoe tels. romney held the post from 1993 to 2002.
going on between bill clinton and then speaker newt gingrich and the government did shut down. the president emerged on both occasions, two shutdowns, in a stronger political position because the american public blamed the conservatives, the republicans in congress more than they blamed the white house. so that is the one area where the white house is saying, look, they have some leverage on that. >> let me ask you this, wolf. you have been at this game a long time. this intractability sounds and feel it's like nothing we have ever seen before. do you have any sort of, i don't know, light on the horizon that you see? are we going to be this polarized and literally make the country pay for what's now become just sheer ugly politics? >> my own gut tells me that between now and the end of the year they will reach a deal. and it will be a compromise and both sides won't be thrilled by it, but it will be better than the alternative. and it will probably go down to the last minute. it usually does. maybe ruin some christmas vacations and stuff like that, but the stakes really are en
. going back to the clinton tax rates, remember, the average american family has taken a hit. median income four years ago was $54,000 a year. it is about $50,000 a year now. this portion of the population has been squeezed. adding taxes on 90% will not be helpful. how much do you want folks to bear? freezing those tax rates for the overwhelming majority of americans is a smart thing to do. host: you said fight later on. guest: the fight would start the next day. we could do what i'm talking about, and negotiations could continue. doing what i'm talking about does not violate what either side is fighting over. they both say this is something we want to do. why not make sure we do not have some last-minute failure at the end of december. guest: what gives you confidence that democrats would agree later on? guest: this is where i disagree with some of my colleagues. they seem to think the american people are leveraged, and this is the democrats leverage. our leverage is in the spending and entitlement issues. the president and his negotiators are smart and able people. they know the re
Search Results 0 to 6 of about 7